Archimedes' Principle
   Archimedes (287-212 B.C.) was a legend during his lifetime. He was a brilliant mathematician and an inventor of the Archimedes' screw, a machine for raising water. Although the lever had been in use long before Archimedes, he worked out the theoretical mathematical principles of its use. He designed the pulley and the windlass, but is best remembered for his work with hydrostatics. His unforgettable cry "Eureka" has made him famous ever since. But it wasn't the cry, it was what he deduced: the Archimedes' principle of specific gravity. His remarkable discovery arose because Hieron, King of Syracuse in Sicily, wished to determine whether a crown was of pure gold or whether the goldsmith had fraudulently alloyed it with some silver. While mulling over this problem,
   Archimedes came to a place of bathing, and there, as he sat in the tub, realized that the amount of water he had displaced must be equal to the bulk of his immersed body. It is said that he did run nude through the streets and did excitedly shout "Eureka" ("I've found it" in Greek). Ever since, the word eureka has been an interjection to express surprise. Archimedes was born in Syracuse, Sicily, and died there while pursuing a problem. The Romans took the town of Syracuse in 212 B.C. However, orders had been issued by the Roman consul Marcellus that Archimedes was not to be harmed, but brought to him alive. The story has it that a Roman soldier informed Archimedes of Marcellus's order, to which Archimedes replied that he was working on a geometrical problem in the sand. "I'll come when I'm finished," he said. Unfortunately the Roman warrior was impatient and with his sword slew Archimedes.

Dictionary of eponyms. . 2013.

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  • Archimedes principle — Archimedo dėsnis statusas T sritis Standartizacija ir metrologija apibrėžtis Skysčių ir dujų statikos dėsnis: kūną, panardintą į skystį ar dujas, veikia išstumiamoji jėga F, lygi kūno išstumto skysčio ar dujų sunkiui; jos veikimo taškas –… …   Penkiakalbis aiškinamasis metrologijos terminų žodynas

  • Archimedes principle — Archimedo dėsnis statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. Archimedes law; Archimedes principle vok. Archimedisches Gesetz, n; Archimedisches Prinzip, n rus. архимедов принцип, m; закон Архимеда, m pranc. principe d’Archimède, m; théorème… …   Fizikos terminų žodynas

  • Archimedes' principle — Archimedes prin|ci|ple the scientific rule which explains that an object in a liquid is kept up by a force which is equal to the weight of the liquid that the object ↑displaces …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Archimedes' principle — Physics. the law that a body immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force (buoyant force) equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. * * * Law of buoyancy, discovered by Archimedes, which states that any object that is completely or… …   Universalium

  • Archimedes' principle — /ˌakəmidiz ˈprɪnsəpəl / (say .ahkuhmeedeez prinsuhpuhl) noun the principle that the apparent loss in weight of a body totally or partially immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced …   Australian English dictionary

  • Archimedes' principle — [ˌα:kɪ mi:di:z] noun Physics a law stating that a body immersed in a fluid is subject to an upward force equal in magnitude to the weight of fluid it displaces …   English new terms dictionary

  • Archimedes' principle — n. the law that a body totally or partially immersed in a fluid is subject to an upward force equal in magnitude to the weight of fluid it displaces …   Useful english dictionary

  • Archimedes — For other uses, see Archimedes (disambiguation). Archimedes of Syracuse (Greek: Ἀρχιμήδης) …   Wikipedia

  • Archimedes — /ahr keuh mee deez/, n. 287? 212 B.C., Greek mathematician, physicist, and inventor: discovered the principles of specific gravity and of the lever. * * * born с 290–280 BC, Syracuse, Sicily died 212/211 BC, Syracuse Legendary Greek inventor and… …   Universalium

  • Archimedes paradox — The Archimedes paradox, named after Archimedes of Syracuse, states that an object can float in a quantity of water that has less volume than the object itself, if its average density is less than that of water. The implication of this is that a… …   Wikipedia

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